Kresich v. Metropolitan Life Insurance Company (MetLife) is a federal case out of the Northern District of California favorable to a plaintiff who was harassed, accused of lying and oppressed during the processing of his disability claim. Because of MetLife’s conduct, the plaintiff sued for intentional infliction of emotional distress (IIED). Despite MetLife’s vigorous argument that the claim was preempted by ERISA and the plaintiff could not pursue his tort action, the court disagreed and found in favor of the plaintiff. Relying on precedent, the court stated “Plaintiff’s IIED claim stems not from the handling and disposition of his claim, but from independent allegations of harassment and oppressive conduct. There is no alternative enforcement mechanism under ERISA by which Plaintiff could bring such a claim.”
Continue Reading California Judge Allows Lawsuit for Intentional Infliction of Emotional Distress Due to Manner in Which MetLife Investigated Disability Claim

Connie White waited more than five years to file a lawsuit against MetLife for denial of her disability benefits. The law in Louisiana only provided Ms. White 5 years to file her legal action. The district court dismissed her disability claim and the 5th Circuit court of appeals affirmed the denial. Disability insurance claimants need

Disability Blog & Cases:
Disability lawsuit against MetLife alleges insurance company refuses to pay disabled claimant

The Metropolitan Life Insurance Company, known as MetLife (NYSE: MET), is being sued in United States District Court, Southern District of Florida, for refusing to honor its contractual obligation to pay long term disability insurance benefits to a psychologically